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Dueling Book Clubs Review The Dark Wife

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A Flash Of Light, The Crackle Of Electricity, The Smell Of Metal Shavings, And Taste Of Magic In The Air Sweet And Powerful And Sharp As A Razor. DaVinci Had His Machines And Merlin His Spells, But The Techno Wizards Have Both In Perfect Unison, A Mystery Even Mecha Dragons Cannot Understand. We Know The Magics Of Ink And Of Oil, And If You Seek Us, You Will Find Us In Our Workshops, Crafting A Masterpiece.

Cast

  • Jeremiah
  • Andrea*
  • Gretchen
  • Mehek
  • Michał

*Sadly, Andrea was unable to join the rest of us again, due to a family emergency.

Book 4: The Dark Wife

You know it’s good when it inspires fanart like this one by SephyStabbity.

The Dark Wife, a lesbian retelling of the Persephone myth, is the debut YA novel from award-winning author of lesbian YA speculative fiction Sarah (S. E.) Diemer. Published in 2011, The Dark Wife won the 2012 Golden Crown Literary Award for Speculative Fiction, and was nominated for a Parsec Award for the first two chapters of the audiobook. Daughter of Zeus, king of the gods, and Demeter, the goddess of the Earth, Persephone grew up being told she would one day succeed Hera as queen of the gods on Olympus. She has everything a young goddess could want, except freedom.

Then one day, Zeus assaults and transforms her lover Charis into a rosebush. Soon after, she meets the enigmatic Hades, “lord” of the dead, and begins to contemplate something new: rebellion. The goddess (not god) of the Underworld then offers Persephone a chance to escape Zeus’s tyranny in the land of the dead. There, Persephone comes face to face with the truth about herself, the afterlife, and the history of the gods she thought she knew. Can she find love, and a new purpose, amongst the dead?

Round Robin

What did you think of the book’s setting?

Mehek: I think the distinctions between Earth, Olympus, and the Underworld offered a lot of richness to the story. You could see the River of Souls in the Underworld, and it sent a shudder down my spine every time it was mentioned. I think we could have stood for a bit more description of the Underworld as a first pan, but that might have taken away from the tightness of the overall story.

Gretchen: She has a vivid descriptive style. I loved how it felt both new and familiar. I grew up reading Greek mythology, so this is a very familiar landscape to me. Yet, the author managed to make it feel fresh and compelling. The various levels of Earth, Olympus, and Underworld reflecting the moods of the gods in charge of them was a neat worldbuilding choice.

Jeremiah: I loved the Underworld the most, but the author did an excellent job making the world itself feel real and lived in.

Michał: The portrayal of the world of Greek gods was my favorite part of the setting. It was pretty brutal, like the Greek myth could be a lot of the time. The Underworld’s first description was pretty powerful. Later on it didn’t feel as impactful.

Gretchen: What do you think changed for you about its description later on in the story? Was it just more familiar the longer Persephone stayed?

Michał: I think so. At first, it was this alien, chthonic realm. Then it just became Persephone’s home. And it lost a lot of its crushing weight.

Jeremiah: I think that was by design though. A lot of times when you first move to a new place there’s a lot of new and exciting ‘magical things’ and then it just becomes home and everything ‘magical’ is really just the normal.

Mehek: I kind of fell in love with it for that exact reason. How it became familiar/home.

Gretchen: Yes! The contrast between when the Underworld felt ‘alien’ and Earth ‘home’ to the contrary by the end of the story stood out. Suddenly the Earth was the world that felt strange. It was a great way to showcase Persephone’s character development. Speaking of which…

Did the characters resonate with you? What did you think of them in general?

Michał: Persephone’s slowly expanding awareness of the world around her worked quite well for me. Unlike with modern fantasy, at the beginning there’s a good chance the reader knows more about Persephone’s world than she does, because the Greek myth is so omnipresent in culture.

Gretchen: Oooh, that’s a good point! When we start, we think we know her story more than she does, only as the narrative progresses, we realizes, as Persephone does, that what we’ve been told isn’t accurate. We get to take the journey of realization with her.

Jeremiah: I like that for once Zeus was portrayed without the varnish of ‘roguish troublemaker’. Diemer showed him as he was: a misogynistic and abusive asshole.

Michał: The mythic Zeus is a pretty cynical answer to the question of “what would someone do if he had the power of the king of the gods”? The answer being, “whatever he damn well pleases”, both in the Greek myth and here.

Mehek: I’m kind of in love with Hades. I appreciated how human she felt and she was fleshed out and generally well developed. One of the struggles I have with first-person narration though, tends to be that the narrator, as a character in the story, feels like there is nothing to them. I enjoyed the story from Persephone’s perspective, but felt as though she wasn’t as developed as she could have been. She felt about as developed as any other first person narrator.

Gretchen: I get what you’re saying. I’m generally Not A Fan of first-person narration. I think Persephone worked better for me than most others I’ve read because we got to see her learn and change her perspective.

Michał: I don’t think this book would have worked without a first-person narration.

Mehek: You’re right. The book wouldn’t have worked if it hadn’t been in first person. But it suffers from what all books suffer from when they are in first person: limited perspective.

Gretchen: I have to say, the rest of the Greek gods were pretty tragic to me. With this abusive asshole at the helm of Olympus, the partying of the gods and Demeter’s passivity came across quite compellingly as methods of coping with Zeus’ abuse and control. I also like that Demeter was so sympathetic even when she made choices we might not agree with.

Michał: I wish we’d seen more of Hermes. He worked well as Persephone’s ‘wingman’, you could say.

(Get it? Because he has wings on his feet…) *collective groan*

Mehek: I totally agree, Michał. Hermes was great and I wanted more of him. I am usually not one to wish books were longer, but in this particular case, I just wanted more and more of Persephone/Hades

Gretchen: I would have loved more from them, too, because what we got was beautiful. Diemer has a way with words, and Persephone has a beautiful voice when she talks about her interactions with Hades. Lyrical. One might even say divine. *badum tiss*

Michał: I liked Pallas, as the closest to a mortal perspective we got. She was dead, so not quite mortal anymore, but still. She lived and died as a mortal human.

What didn’t work with the novel?

Jeremiah: Well, this is going to be hard because I kind of adore this book. I’m racking my brain for anything that really put me off or pulled me out of the story. I said this when the book was recommended, I think this book is amazing.

Gretchen: I’m with you on that. I can’t think of anything bad to say about it. I loved every inch of it and devoured it in basically one sitting.

Michał: I’m going to say something surprising, which is that the romance honestly didn’t work all that well for me. Not that it was bad, just… not terribly riveting to read.

Mehek: I can see what you’re saying. You know it’s going to happen, it’s obvious really quickly, so the romance wasn’t built all that much.

Jeremiah: Nope. Riveted. Happy lesbian love stories a rare gem in of themselves but even ignoring that, loved it.

Mehek: I mean, I am in love with this book and want to marry it and have it’s babies, but I do see what Michał is saying.

Gretchen: HA! I second the idea of marrying this book. Yes please. I want to take it with me to bed every night.

Michal: Like I said, it’s not bad, but just as Mehek said, it’s a bit of a foregone conclusion. I found Persephone’s rebellion against the pre-established, seemingly unmoving world order much more compelling. The resolution to that felt too quick, even if I liked how it happened because she did something no one had considered before.

Gretchen: That’s acceptable…I guess 😉 But all kidding aside, that was a compelling part of the book, so I can see why it drew you so strongly.

Jeremiah: Whatever, the love story was awesome. Ya’ll got holes in your hearts.

What Did Work in the Novel?

Gretchen: So clearly that love story was one thing that worked well, at least for most of us 😉 I can’t tell you how refreshing it was to read basically a domestic Hades and Persephone story. Like. They’re precious. Also pretty much the embodiment of that Hades/Persephone ‘hold my flower’ meme. I love it.

They’re pretty much this, minus the beard on Hades of course. (source)

Jeremiah: Diemer’s words seem effortless. I’ve read her other work and they all share that same easy flow of language. She has a way of allowing her characters have their day in court. Even Zeus is allowed a little understanding, not forgiveness, but a small bit of empathy. I loved how epic the story felt while still busying itself with the small details of this budding romance.

Gretchen: Her language is lyrical, flowing, and atmospheric. All of her metaphors and imagery flawlessly match the setting. Earth felt lush, dreamy, vibrant. The Underworld dark, mysterious, and somehow vast despite being underground. The scene where we meet Gaia? I can’t even begin to describe how breathtaking it is to read.

Mehek: I just wanted to flip it back to the beginning and start re-reading the second I finished. I had to restrain myself from buying everything else the author has written. I don’t know what we, as a society, did to deserve something so lovely but. It’s so, so lovely.

Gretchen: Seconded. Go read this book. Seriously. It’s everything. Hades gets Persephone a three-headed puppy. When will your OTP ever?

Jeremiah: I have read this book many, many times. Not as many as Fried Green Tomatoes At The Whistle Stop Cafe, but still, a lot.

Michał: Not going to lie, puppy Cerberus was the highlight of this book. But I enjoyed it primarily as a mythic retelling, and rebellion story. We’re shown this natural order of things — Zeus is the king of heaven and none dare oppose him, only appease him. The Underworld is a dreary place of misery. Persephone has no time for either of that.

Closing/Overall Thoughts

Gretchen: Everything is amazing, go read it. The end.

Jeremiah: As far as retellings of myths go this ranks up there with Jean Cocteau’s Orpheus. Both in terms of understanding the material and with the verve to play with it. On top of that it’s just lovely people. Come on, the world’s on fire, but we have this book so we might be ok.

Michał: This is the lesbian fairy tale you were looking for. Even if you’re not looking for one, though, this is a damn good mythic retelling and subversion. Written in beautiful language.

Gretchen: I wholeheartedly agree. It takes everything we think we know about Greek mythology and upends just about all of it. The handling of the realm of the dead, the tragedy of the Elysian Fields as a place where soldiers spend the rest of eternity with their misery and trauma was masterful. I especially appreciate that the resolution to that was hope, compassion, and allowing the dead to find a way to move past their sins and find forgiveness and healing. A+. All the awards for that.

Mehek: This book is really wonderful. Read it, treasure it, enjoy it. I wish I had the words to encompass my love for this book but go forth and read it yourself to find out why I’m speechless.


Images Courtesy of Createspace Independent Publishers

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I was conveniently stuck in a hospital after surgery when I heard this recommendation over the Fandomentals podcast. Downloaded immediately, finished it during the stay, absolutely freaking loved it.

Thanks for helping make the hospitalization go by that much quicker!

Books

Kel Protects Everybody in Page

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Image courtesy of Penguin Random House

Well, except for herself that is. First published in 2000, Page deals with Kel’s next three years of page training. It takes her on a journey through growing up. It also showcases just how powerful her protective streak is. In this book, Kel protects so many people. While First Test largely focused on distinguishing itself from Song of the LionessPage is able to start working on the backbone of this series as a whole. Pierce uses Kel’s protective streak as a way to talk about the various problems in Tortallen society.

Spoilers for all of Page and Pierce’s previous books. Content warning for mentions of attempted sexual assault. (more…)

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Books

Ghân-buri-Ghân and the Pressure of the Past

Katie

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So. My guys. Ghân-buri-Ghân. I have been low-key dreading this chapter since the start of our re-read, wondering what useful things I could possibly say about a white British professor in the 1950s indulging in an obvious and unfortunate noble savage trope. I mean, there’s a reason that even Peter Jackson—not exactly a bastion of inclusivity and racial sensitivity in his depictions of Tolkien—decided to just leave this bit out.

I’d love to give you a little turn here and reveal that hey-guys-actually-Ghân-buri-Ghân-isn’t-so-bad. But, well… Ghân-buri-Ghân is not great. He could be worse? But that doesn’t seem to be the most useful measuring stick. So instead, let’s take a look at why Ghân-buri-Ghân is in this story at all. And why he is the one to set the stage for one of the most striking passages in Tolkien, where Théoden arrives at the walls of Minas Tirith at dawn and thunders across the Pelennor that only a chapter ago seemed soaked in despair.

Ghân-buri-Ghân

Ghân-buri-Ghân and the Wild Men

Let’s start with the obvious: Ghân-buri-Ghân and the Wild-men are dehumanized and exoticized pretty consistently from the start. Within a page or two of his introduction he is compared to a beast, a rock, and a plant. The Wild-men are “remnants of an older time,” Elfhelm tells Merry. And they are “wild and wary as the beasts.” Ghân-buri-Ghân himself is “gnarled as an old stone” and his beard “straggled on his lumpy chin like dry moss.” Merry has difficulty telling him and the other Wild-men apart from each other. And while the Wild-men are never given any explicitly racial characteristics, they are characterized by habits that would be associated with “exoticism” from a European colonial perspective: grass skirts and communication over distances by drums.

To Tolkien’s credit, he does push back against this idea a little bit, largely through Ghân-buri-Ghân’s repeated refusal to be patronized. He repeatedly calls out Éomer for treating him like a child and for interrupting him. He has his own ideas and agenda that extend beyond helping the nice horse lords who happened to stop by. Though on a side-note—Tolkien also manages to make the Wild-men seem preternaturally chill when he casually reveals that they are helping Théoden and his men despite the fact that the Rohirrim, in the past, apparently hunted the Wild-men for sport. Jesus, Rohan.

So. We have a scenario where Ghân-buri-Ghân is given a solid sense of agency in his appearance but is also loaded up with baggage associated with colonial attitudes towards the “uncivilized” peoples of the world. But none of this really answers the question: why is Ghân-buri-Ghân here? Why is he in the story at all? It’d be easy to have the exact same thing happen, but simply have the knowledge of the hidden path lie with one of the Rohirrim or Théoden himself. It would streamline the story and skip the necessity of a whole different group of characters. You could even as gone so far as to simply start the chapter with Théoden’s arrival on the field, and combine it with the next’ chapter’s battle.

Ghân-buri-Ghân

Past and Present in The Return of the King

Of course, that’s not what happens. Instead, our next chapter features the imminent fall of Minas Tirith being averted by two sudden arrivals. Théoden and the Rohirrim appear, shepherded there by the Wild-men. And Aragorn and the Dúnedain arrive, backed by the Dead Men of Dunharrow.

Now, I’m not totally sure what this means. I’m open to ideas, and it’s something that I’ll be continuing to think about (the perils of writing an article the day it’s due, sorry friends). But in any case, it seems intriguing to me that both our kings—Théoden and Aragorn—make their triumphant arrival at Minas Tirith thanks solely to the aid of mysterious and unexpected forces of the past. Aragorn calls up a ghost army. Théoden is guided by a people that—as noted in this great article by Ethan Campbell —are directly tied to wodwos, the wild, forest-men of medieval romances like Gawain and the Green Knight. This commonality is only highlighted by Merry’s observation that the Wild-men reminded him of the Púkel-men that lined the way to the Paths of the Dead at Dunharrow.

Neither case is really attributable to plot dynamics. Both of these things could have happened without the last-minute, unexpected assist. So the fact that they do, and that they happen in such tight thematic parallel, makes me think that there must be something more intentional at play. Though it’s hard without more extended interactions with either group, I think it’s at least possible to make the case that this double assist serves as a nice thematic underpinning of Tolkien’s repeated idea that the past is something to be remembered but not necessarily blinded emulated.

While Aragorn’s past is literally what qualifies him for the throne—and what gets him his ghost army—Théoden’s and Rohan’s interactions with their past are much more ambivalent. It’s obvious to the reader that the Wild-men have been mistreated in the past. The same can be said for the treatment of the Dunlendings in The Two Towers. The fact that Minas Tirith is delivered largely thanks to a ghost army who betrayed their leaders in the past and a small group men who have been betrayed themselves, creates an interesting note of moral and historical complexity in a scene that could otherwise easily be read as a standard clash of good and evil.

Ghân-buri-Ghân

The Charge of the Rohirrim

Even without that complexity, though: Théoden’s charge and the arrival of the Rohirrim is such a stirring narrative moment. It would have been so easy for it to be cheesy: Widfara’s sudden claims that “the wind is turning” and the dawn is coming are standard fantasy tropes. But man, the execution of it. This is Tolkien at his best.

The Rohirrim’s easy arrival at the wall and painstakingly slow walk across the outer fields makes it feel as if the Riders are literally entering into the tone of the last chapter. The world is filled with darkness, despair, gloom and fire. Merry is horrified. Théoden seemed “to shrink down, cowed by age.” Effort seems wasted, and there seems no place to go. And then, there’s the turn.  It’s good enough that I want to look at the whole thing in full:

Then suddenly, Merry felt it at last, beyond doubt: a change. Wind was in his face! Light was glimmering. Far, far away, in the South the clouds could be dimly seen as remote grey shapes, rolling up, drifting: morning lay beyond them.

But at that same moment there was a flash, as if lightning had sprung from the earth beneath the City. For a searing second it stood dazzling far off in black and white, its topmost tower like a glittering needle; and then as darkness closed again there came rolling over the fields a great boom.

At that sound the bent shape of the king sprung suddenly erect. Tall and proud he seemed again; and rising in his stirrups he cried in a loud voice, more clear than any there had ever heard a mortal man achieve before:

Arise, riders of Théoden!
Fell deeds awake: fire and slaughter!
spear shall be shaken, shield shall be splintered,
a sword day, a red day, ere the sun rises!
Ride now, ride now! Ride to Gondor!

With that he seized a great horn from Guthláf his banner-bearer and blew such a blast upon it that it burst asunder… Suddenly the king cried to Snowmane and he sprang away. Behind him his banner blew in the wind, white horse upon a field of green, but he outpaced it. After him thundered the knights of his house, but he was ever before them. Éomer rode there, the white horsetail on his helm floating in his speed, and the front of the first éored roared like a breaker foaming to shore, but Théoden could not be overtaken. Fey he seemed, or the battle-fury of his fathers ran like new fire through his veins, and he was borne upon Snowmane like a god of old, even as Oromë the Great in the battle of the Valar when the world was young. His golden shield was uncovered, and lo! It shone like an image of the Sun, and the grass flamed into green about the white feet of his steed. For morning came, morning and a wind from the sea; and darkness was removed, and the hosts of Mordor wailed, and terror took them, and they fled, and died, and the hoofs of wrath rode over them.

It’s such a wonderful, visceral passage, filled with alliteration and momentum. All those B’s and F’s! The way Tolkien moves from sentences structured along the lines of A, but B (Behind him his banner blew in the wind, white horse upon a field of green, but he outpaced it. After him thundered the knights of his house, but he was ever before them) to a series of shorter and shorter clauses creates a syntax that seems to accelerate along with the riders themselves. It’s a near-perfect passage, a bright release after chapters of mounting dread.

Ghân-buri-Ghân

why isn’t it blowing asunder, pj

Final Comments

  • I’d love to hear anyone’s thoughts on Ghân-buri-Ghân’s diction and speaking patterns. On one side I could sort of see the argument that he’s simply speaking the way anyone would speak in language they aren’t comfortable speaking. Lots of dropped articles, overly-literal translations. But at the same time it just sounds SO MUCH like a stereotype of “uncivilized” speech, like an American Indian in an old western flick. I want to give Tolkien more credit, as a linguist, than indulging in something like that. But I’m not sure it’s warranted.
  • Another chapter-related note from Ethan Campbell’s article: Théoden’s speech to his riders before their charge is heavily influenced by the famous Old English poem about the Battle of Maldon. If you are intrigued, Tolkien wrote a fan fiction sequel and published it in a scholarly journal (which is my new professional goal now, I guess).
  • Elfhlem and the rest of the company seem to be find with turning a blind eye to Merry’s presence. I’m assuming that they know that Dernhelm is Éowyn as well? It seems pretty likely to me—they have “an understanding,” as Merry notes. And I like the idea of the Rohirrim deciding to cover for her.
  • Tolkien continues to get a kick out of the Enemy ironically undermining their own plans through excessive, thoughtless badness. This time through Éomer: “Our Enemy’s devices oft serve us in his despite. The accursed darkness itself has been a cloak to us. And now, lusting to destroy Gondor and throw it down stone from stone, his orcs have taken away my greatest fear. The out-wall could have been held long against us.”
  • Merry wished he was a tall rider like Éomer and could blow a horn or something and go galloping to [Pippin’s] rescue. This is such a charming little sentence that nicely underlines how out of his element Merry is here. He doesn’t even quite know what a tall rider would do to go save some one. Blow a horn? Or something?
  • Tolkien taught me this week that “writhe” can be an adjective, as in “writhen mountains.” Into it.
  • Prose Prize: … last two paragraphs? Honestly, just go read the last page or two. It’s Tolkien at his best, using his prose to craft a wave of momentum, his tone elevated and archaic but crackling with energy at the same time.
  • Contemporary to this Chapter: Faramir is wounded, the Pelennor is overrun, the siege of Gondor continues. Off to the south Aragorn is seizing the fleet at Pelagir. Over to the east Frodo gets himself captured and then freed from Cirith Ungol.
  • Next time we finally come to the Battle of Pelennor Fields. Bring your own tissues! I am already sad!

All images are from Peter Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003), courtesy of New Line Cinema.

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Analysis

Encroaching Darkness and Endings

Claire

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Presented by “Harry Potter and the Reread Project

So it’s been a while since I’ve published the last Harry Potter Reread piece, as unfortunately other obligations kept my away from my favourite book series. To recap quickly, the last reread post essentially took a longer look at most of the Trio’s camping trip: Ron majorly freaked out, abandoning his friends, returning to save Harry’s life and earning the right to destroy a Horcurx in the process, Dumbledore’s goodness was questioned more and more and Harry hit what’s probably his lowest point in the books so far. Ultimately, the Trio decides to visit Xenophilius Lovegood, is tricked and trapped by him and only escapes by the skin of their teeth.

A Dangerous Dream

The fallout of the visit in Ottery St. Catchpole seems, at first look, to be much smaller than the fallout from being trapped in Godric’s Hollow. Godric’s Hollow cost Harry his wand, which he thought of as his most powerful weapon against Voldemort. Visiting Xenophilius Lovegood, on the other hand, shows Harry a way to beat Voldemort: becoming the master of the Deathly Hallows and thus, supposedly, death himself. Unfortunately, Harry learning about the Hallows spectacularly backfires. Much like Dumbledore himself, he becomes so obsessed with the idea of the Hallows that he loses track of everything else for a while and starts to neglect his actual mission-

art by davinciblr

That’s, however, entirely understandable. When the Trio goes to visit Xenophilius, they are entirely out of other ideas, as Hermione admits. Dumbledore left the Trio with a monumental task and, as has been pointed out continuously ever since the seventh book was published, with very little pointers as to how to accomplish said task.

Additionally, Harry has been doubting Dumbledore more and more since his death, especially because of how little help and preparation he has actually received. Believing that Dumbledore actually did place all of the pieces to saving himself in front of him restores at least some of the faith in his mentor, maybe even in the most crucial aspect of his relationship with Dumbledore. Assuming that the Hallows are real and Dumbledore meant for Harry to find them means that Dumbledore didn’t leave him entirely unprepared and is thus proof that Dumbledore cared about him.

That this leads to a fairly massive conflict between Harry and Hermione is about as unsurprising as Harry’s obsession with the Hallows. After all, Hermione’s narrative job is to be the voice of reason and to balance out Harry’s – and sometimes, Ron’s – hotheadedness. Considering that hotheadedness, it’s also no surprise that Harry messes up and uses Voldemort’s name when he’s fighting with Hermione. The Trio then gets captured and taken to Malfoy Manor, where Bellatrix tortures Hermione and reveals the location of the next Horcrux by chance. After their escape and Dobby’s death, this is what Harry chooses to focus on, rather than continuing his quest for the Hallows.

While JKR leads up to this choice quite interestingly, there are a two aspects of the chapters surrounding that decision that annoy me. For one, we never really get Harry’s actual reasoning for why he decides to give up on the Elder Wand. Until the end of the chapter, JKR doesn’t even make it explicitly clear that this is what Harry decided and just alludes to an important decision having been made instead. Then, when she does make it clear that Harry has decided to prioritize information about the next Horcrux over keeping Voldemort from taking the Elder Wand from Dumbledore’s grave, Harry simply justifies it by saying that Dumbledore didn’t want him to have the Elder Wand. Later on, JKR lets Harry think that he can’t satisfactorily explain what lead to this decision because the internal arguments that lead to this decision – that JKR never actually put on the page – sound feeble to him in the aftermath of the decision.

Additionally, Hermione had to get tortured for Harry to arrive at the decision that Hermione had been arguing for for weeks. There’s a very “woman in the refrigerator” dynamic about this, though she does survive. But making female characters suffer to further the character growth of male characters is an age old dynamic, and it’s not especially enjoyable to read.

The Goblin issue

What also isn’t especially enjoyable to read is the portrayal of Griphook and goblins in general. Creating a fantasy race that is obsessed with wealth, untrustworthy, cunning, hooked-nosed, and then having them decide to take a neutral standpoint in the war against, well, Wizarding fascism comes with its own host of unfortunate implications.

There’s a very good essay on JStor called “Knockers, Knackers, and Ghosts: Immigrant Folklore in the Western Mines” pointing out the connection between “knockers”, folklore creatures that goblins can be said to be based upon, were explicitly connected to the ghosts of Jewish people. The idea of the goblin as a fantasy creature developed from this point onwards, and essentially became a staple of fantasy literature, much like dwarves, dragons, unicorns, werewolves and giants. According to Ronald James’s essay, the belief that the Knockers were Jewish ghosts was lost when the folklore migrated to the American colonies. However, folk creatures linked to the knockers and goblins especially retained the attributes stereotypically associated with antisemitic caricatures of Jews: greed and untrustworthiness.

The fact that a classic fantasy creature that she uses in her writing is clearly influenced by antisemitic stereotypes is, of course, not at all JKR’s fault. But the way she handles it is. And she does handle it fairly badly, especially considering that with other fantasy creatures, she tries to subvert their typical portrayal. I’ve already written about how successful that endeavor is with giants and werewolves, but with goblins, it seems like she barely even tried. Harry is told not to trust goblins in the very first book already, and although Hermione points out that wizards have marginalised goblins for centuries, that distrust ultimately seems to have been justified.

At the same time, there’s a certain irony to the Trio aiming to deceive a goblin, who is used to deception by wizards and thus inherently doesn’t trust them, and being outsmarted by him. One could, of course, argue – like Harry does himself – that promising Griphook Gryffindor’s sword but never specifying when he’d get it and then keeping it until the Horcruxes are destroyed is technically not a deception. Griphook would have gotten the sword at some point, after all. But it’s still a dishonest way of treating an ally and Griphook taking the sword is just him making sure that he got what was promised to him.

Turning Cruel?

One thing I liked about the interactions between the Trio and Griphook was Hermione passionately telling Griphook about fighting not just for wizards, but against all injustice in the wizarding world. It’s essentially a plea for an universally respectful and fair approach to politics that doesn’t fight against the marginalisation of just one group. The contradiction between that appeal and the Trio’s actual way of treating Griphook is pretty obvious, however.

I do get why Harry decides to act the way he does. I also get why he uses the Imperius curse when breaking into Gringotts. It’s essentially a “the end justify the means”-situation. In Harry’s opinion, fighting Voldemort justifies acting in ways that he would normally condemn. Considering what Voldemort is meant to represent, I don’t have a problem with that.

What I do have a problem with is the narrative framing of Harry’s usage of the Unforgivable Curses: there is no moment in which Harry struggles with having used the Imperius curse and when he tortures Amycus Carrow, it’s present as a moment of strength and victory. McGonagall even calls it “gallant”. And while Harry using the Imperius curse in Gringotts can be read as either seeming like an absolute necessity to finish the mission in the moment when he uses it or as something that Griphook manipulated him into, there’s no excuse or reason behind him using the Cruciatus on Carrow.

Considering how much effort JKR put into showing how horrible both the Cruciatus curse and the Carrows are, this could have easily been framed as a moment that Harry breaks, repays the cruelty the Wizarding World has shown him with cruelty, and actually emotionally struggles with. It would have even been fairly easy to include a short scene in which Harry, on the way back to the Room of Requirement from the Great Hall, doubts his actions. There is, after all, a scene in which Harry doubts whether he is turning into Dumbledore, who doesn’t trust anyone, when he is faced with the choice of letting the other DA members help. And how great would it have been if Harry had wondered for a moment what the war was doing to him, realised the risk of it turning him cruel and angry and decided to make a conscious effort to never be cruel? But unfortunately, that’s not the route JKR goes.

Familiar developments

The trio breaking into the Ministry to steal Slytherin’s locket on from Umbridge is, as I already discussed, one of my favourite parts of Deathly Hallows. It’s a perfectly executed “undercover mission gone wrong”-plot but with the darker twist of showing what a turn for the worse the Ministry has taken. Something similar is true of the break-in at Gringotts: while it doesn’t go as in depth with its description of the horribleness as the Ministry scenes, there’s the gut-wrenching scene of a man attacking Bellatrix, Voldemort’s right hand, for taking away his children. It’s an act of complete desperation, underlined by the fact that people without wands are treated as less than human.

The break-in at Gringotts has the same basic structure as the break-in into the Ministry: there is a long period of planning, of which the readers see fairly little, there are unforeseen complications during the very first stage of the operation that force the heroes to improvise: splitting up in the Ministry, Imperiusing Travers and Bogrod, which are mostly caused by the heroes own unpreparedness – not doing more research on the ministry workers they are impersonating, not realising that the goblins know that Bellatrix’ wand was stolen. This ultimately forces them into heroic acts to escape, like freeing the Muggleborns who are awaiting trial and the imprisoned dragon. That’s not really surprising: it’s essentially the classic heist-movie plot. Additionally, while both break-ins allow the heroes to accomplish their goal of retrieving a Horcrux, they also set them back.

What’s interesting is that although the basic structure of the chapters is the same and they both work with very similar premises, the break-in at the Ministry feels a lot less triumphant than the break-in at Gringotts. One the one hand, I think it’s because the Ministry chapter explores the dynamics of a Voldemort-ruled Wizarding world much more in depth than the Gringotts break-in. On the other hand, I think it’s because it’s clearer what the break-in at Gringotts is leading up to. The goal of destroying Voldemort is no longer in the far-off distance. Of course, it’s entirely possible that that’s an impression I have based on the fact that I’m reading the books for the hundredth time and that first-time readers perceive it entirely differently.

And Familiar Faces

The second-to-last part of Deathly Hallows brings back a whole bunch of characters that have essentially disappeared for either most of the book or even most of the series. Griphook and Ollivander, for example, were both introduced in Philosopher’s Stone but essentially became completely irrelevant afterwards. That they returned and became crucial in driving the plot forward in the final book is a fairly classic JKR move and, as I’ve mentioned before, one of my favourite aspects of the series.

Then there’s, of course, Dobby. Another thing I’ve already mentioned earlier during this project is that I never really got the love many fans of the series have for him and instead have been rather torn about him. That’s probably why his death isn’t especially high on my list of sad scenes in Deathly Hallows, even though I’m able to see why it’s an objectively sad scene. After all, Dobby engages in the ultimate act of rebellion for a house-elf, turning against his (former) masters, and pays for it with his life. And Dobby is set up to just be an unequivocally morally good being: he is loyal to the point of blindness, he has no intention to harm anyone, he is willing to make sacrifices and push past his own fears to achieve his goals. At the same time, I find his portrayal rather ambiguous. It’s clear that his admiration of Harry is based more on the way Harry treats him than on believing in the values Harry represents and Dobby’s always shown to be rather child-like intellectually, to the point of being incapable of thinking his actions through logically. Looking at the series and his role in it as a whole, his death seems like the logical conclusion of the way his character is set up.

Another character development that seems like the logical endpoint of a journey is Neville, though that could and should have been better executed, in my opinion. As much as Neville is shy, awkward and clumsy at the beginning of the series, the seeds for his great entrance in Deathly Hallows as leader of Dumbledore’s Army at Hogwarts have been there ever since he confronted the Trio in the common room. That he had it in him to be a fierce fighter if necessary became clear when he insisted to go to the Ministry to rescue Sirius and held his ground against the Death Eaters.

Unfortunately, he fades into the background for most of The Half-Blood Prince and is essentially irrelevant in Deathly Hallows until he reappears. That means that his development from a guy who’s usually shy but good under pressure to a complete badass who stands up to violent Death Eaters to the point where they consider murdering him happens entirely off-page. It’s not unbelievable for him to develop in this direction, but it would have been better writing to actually see more of this development.

Which is a statement that is true of the entire Hogwarts-subplot. Other people have suggested in the comments that Deathly Hallows would have been better if it had been split between the narrator accompanying Harry and someone who’s at Hogwarts, but I disagree. I think moving away from the classic school setting into a underground resistance setting as well as splitting the narrative focus between settings for more than one chapter would have been a too radical break from the established style of the series. However, JKR finding a way to keep Harry in touch with people in Hogwarts – Aberforth giving a piece of the two-way mirror to one of the members of Dumbledore’s Army, for example – would have made it possible for the readers and Harry to be up to date on what is happening at Hogwarts without creating the narrative split. Additionally, Harry knowing what was going on at Hogwarts and being torn between his actual mission and wanting to help his friends would have been amazing and heart-breaking to read about.

The next piece of the “Harry Potter Reread Project” takes on the final bit of Deathly Hallows, as Voldemort returns to Hogwarts, “possessed f that cold, cruel sense of purpose that preceded murder”.


 

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