Connect with us

Comics

Saga: Anticipation and Dread

Published

on

Well, I gotta come clean here. It’s been a little more than a week since this issue’s been out. I’ll claim my little finger’s been broken and aching, but the truth is, I’ve been occupied exploring the marvelous world of poetry. As in, actually attempting to write it. Not an easy thing to seriously undertake. Safe to say, though, as with every seemingly unrelated thing I feature in these introductions, it is truly (somewhat) relevant. To sit down and write isn’t to wait for inspiration, but seeking the proper phrasing. Adding the poetry factor, it’s also seeking the proper form. All in all, it’s a more active process than apparent. It’s in fact the most possibly active thing you can do while your butt is on the seat.

This issue isn’t merely another pit stop for our heroes as they wait for the next progression of events. We’ve had a few of those so far already, and something always happens. Maybe misfortune or surprise is about to catch up, maybe some drama will brew within their numbers. Maybe it’s a bit of those, plus a little flirting with forms, tropes, imagery; all leading to a stage I’ve encountered often these days, to my wonder and frustration: the uncertainty of how a few lines will fit with the rest.

Will it make or break the poem?

Issue #51
“So bloody what?”

This issue starts with a sharp plunge into uncanny valley. Ever since a beloved ex convinced me to watch Neon Genesis Evangelion, crayon pictures tend to creep a chill up my spine. The ability of innocence to crudely portray some hideous thing is some brutal honesty. Thus, Squire reprising The Will’s warning about his old man brings up an uncomfortable truth. Even though Sir Robot’s more or less a good guy now, signs of his old vicious self still peek out from the edges of his screen-face. We’ve seen all manner of horrible images come up on that screen, but none is quite as ominous as the stark full-red on Sir Robot when his son confronts him about having killed The Stalk.

Squire, by curiosity or an attempt to better understand his father, asks to see that moment. The response may well be one of the most disturbing moments in Saga, as Sir Robot briefly gives in to his ghosts and unwittingly begins to strangle his own son. He quickly realizes what he’s doing and immediately attempts to comfort Squire. This probably won’t do much to deter Squire’s secret plan to run away.

That’s been quite horrible, so let’s shift the mood by advancing into daytime. A brighter hour, and a brighter set of circumstances and setting. This is, Doff teaching Hazel how to swim while Ghüs sunbathes. Swell times all around, wholesome and pure. There is some celebration to be had, namely Hazel getting the hang of it. There’s also a little comedic content—namely Hazel being called out for having a potty mouth. Suddenly, a wild mustached king fish shows appears, a lovely, colourful, and very rarely seen, manta-ray-like creature. Doff, a passionate photographer has wanted to immortalize one of these in a picture since he was a child, so off he goes on a little adventure of his own.

I do love these moments when you get a little insight into the background of a character, especially when it comes to their personal fascinations. A character is essentially a narrative artifice, but these little jewels certainly make that wall a little more ethereal. In much the same vein, we know of Alana and Marko’s love of (a particular kind of) literature. So it shouldn’t be much of a shock to find that the latter has also had a few furtive dabblings in writing. Nonetheless, Alana still looks pleased when finding out her husband has been working on a secret novella, using a typewriter facilitated by their Hebdomadal buddies.

Overabundance of adverbs notwithstanding (heh), Alana finds herself drawn in. The plot is vaguely Orpheic: an artist kills herself to get into Hell in order to retrieve her stolen stencils. We’ll see if this becomes a bit more fleshed out as the issues pass by, but one thing is for sure: it resonates with Alana, perhaps a little too much, judging by the splash page here. Again, we’ll see where this takes us.

Elsewhere, two characters as different as alike have a little chat in the setting of waiting for an important phone call. Petri is not a trusting person, especially when it comes to journalism. Upsher, cynical as he sometimes may be, does believe in Hebdomadal’s integrity in spite of Jetsam’s (frank acknowledged) government being as corrupt as any other. Candour is a good facilitator for communication between differing worldviews, which succeeds in setting some common ground between the two. Suddenly, a wild telephone rings.

We’ve all been there. It’s one thing to await a phone call. It may be something of a restless experience. But it’s wholly different to be the one awaiting the call while not being the recipient, because your reception is subject to the one who takes the call, and in reading their reactions, you’ve no remedy but completing the rest of the conversation in your head. It is good news, is it bad news? Upsher can be a bit of dick at times, but he’s not cruel. The deal is on, the materials for Petri, Sir Robot and Squire’s transformation will be on their way.

Cue the relief that follows anticipation at its finest. However, one must note there is another facet to anticipation, a darker side which we know as dread: a mixture of uncertainty and expectations of the worst kind. This dread often kicks in with a visual cue, such as, for example, a character walking into some secluded place, unaware of outside forces aiming to cast the world into disarray. Not dread for the character, but for the reader. I have to praise the framework in this bit: we know she’s been closing in, and she’s gloated so much of her many wrongdoings that we know her discourse without needing any variation on her speech bubbles.

And even though she doesn’t show up in the same frame as when she speaks, we know Ianthe has finally caught up to our heroes.

Holding Doff at gunpoint, Ianthe threatens him into revealing Hazel’s whereabouts while acknowledging her full intents. She will take Hazel and use her as a diplomatic asset and kill everybody else. Doff feigns ignorance but Ianthe calls his bluff to the mocking tune of “Lying Woman!”, most likely an allusion to The Will’s former partner, Lying Cat. A sadist, this one is. However, her ‘minion’, the enslaved Will manages to buy a little time for Doff to attack Ianthe. It’s a bold, but foolish move, considering she’s armed. Doff has already had a brush with death, at the hands of The Will himself. But this time, it doesn’t look like he’ll come out alive.

Ianthe gets up, casting aside Doff’s body, which boasts a very nasty and deadly-looking wound. She starts barking out orders for her minion to follow, only to realize Doff’s true intentions. He didn’t mean to take her down; rather he was aiming to get a hold of Ianthe’s remote to unshackle William in order to make this former freelancer, well, free again. Doff, you beautiful sea man, why must you be a hero?

The sacrifice wasn’t in vain, it seems. It’s quite lovely when a villain lets out an acknowledgement of vulnerability. With The Will nowhere in sight, his shackles discarded, the words “oh no” sound just delightful right now.

Stay tuned for the next verse in this poem, one figure lighter than before, however. Not looking forward to Upsher’s reaction, to be honest.


Saga Issue #51 Credits
Writer: Brian K. Vaughan
Artist: Fiona Staples
All images are courtesy of Image Comics

Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

avatar
 
  Subscribe  
Notify of

Analysis

Our First Look at Imbalance

Michał

Published

on

By

Greetings, readers of the Fandomentals. Today I bring you a review of the new Avatar: The Last Airbender comic, Imbalance. I wrote about it before, being rather skeptical of how it would do. Having read it… my skepticism remains, but so far my impressions are mostly positive. Faith Erin Hicks, a new writer for the franchise, seems to know where she’s taking it. Let’s begin.

The story

We open with the Gaang traveling on Appa. Their destination is Yu Dao, but Toph asks Aang to stop by Earthern Fire Industries, which her father operates. I believe those first appeared in the Rift comic, but I haven’t read it. However, as it turns out, there’s far more than just a factory there. A whole town sprung up – Cranefish town. Which seems to be a predecessor of Republic City.

As befits a city that appeared so quickly, the whole place is distinctly ramshackle. The heroes land and meet with a rather cold welcome. The citizenry are entirely unconcerned with them and unimpressed by Aang’s bending. Soon enough, Toph’s father appears to welcome them… or rather, Aang, giving his daughter something of a cold shoulder. He says he needs the Avatar’s help.

The reason for his asking becomes apparent shortly, as a fight breaks out between a firebender and earthbender gang. Aang tries to negotiate, only for both sides to claim they’re clearly in the right and he should support them. Toph, of course, swoops in to knock some sense into the fighters while Sokka uncharacteristically claims sometimes it’s best to stand aside and let benders blow off steam. This viewpoint seems shared by the leader of the earthbender gang, who tells all non-benders present to stay out of the way.

During the struggle, a nearby building starts collapsing. Toph tries to stop it, but Aang airbends her away instead, explaining that there was no saving it. Katara had evacuated the inhabitants, as it turns out (entirely off-screen, but more on that later), but the gang members had escaped.

Aang is surprised by how many people lived in that building and offers to rebuild it… only for the citizens to refuse because they don’t want benders’ help. Aang and Sokka head to the city’s “business council”, while Toph and Katara go to the factory. Toph is rather cross with her father for snubbing her.

The council meeting is eventful and reveals the bender/non-bender tensions that split the city. The two groups sit on the opposite sides of the chamber and it quickly becomes obvious why. Non-benders don’t feel safe walking their own streets and Lao proposes a radical solution: ban bending in the streets. This goes about as well as you would expect.

Meanwhile, Toph and Katara visit the factory, which turns out to have grown in size, scope, and technology. Satoru also reveals another side to the conflict plaguing the city: benders losing their jobs. After introducing more advanced ore-processing machinery, the help of benders wasn’t as needed, so he let some of them go to reduce costs, as skilled benders get paid more. This made the other feel they were being replaced, so they quit in protest. This included the factory’s earthbender guards, which is why non-benders protect it now. Things got worse when other factories adopted the same technology, leading to more benders losing work.

In the council chamber, Aang opposes the bending ban, as it would punish honest benders as well. He suggests instead to create a proper police force that would keep Cranefish Town safe. One of the bending councilors, Liling, quickly rises to support him. She says she has a “skilled security team” that can become the town’s police force with some training. Lao points out that the police force should also include non-benders, which is quickly brushed off as something that will be taken care of after the benders are trained. He still has doubts, but the council promptly votes in favor of the proposal.

Afterward, Aang meets with Katara and together they go to an island near the town, which I assume will eventually become Air Temple Island. Aang struggles with his usual dilemma of progress feeling out of control. He remembers Lady Tienhai the spirit of the place, and how she believed in humans. Katara offers words of reassurance as always and they settle on making the city a better place to live.

We cut to the firebenders we’d seen fighting in the streets. They’re receiving a haranguing from an older man in the same clothes for trying to steal from people too poor to have anything. Then the door breaks down and in come two young women with a distinct familial resemblance to Liling. They offer the firebenders place in a “movement” that will benefit all benders and a job away from a life of crime. The firebenders refuse and one of the women promptly earthbends them into compliance.

The Gaang, meanwhile, head to the beach, which Aang had decided to clean up, much to the others’ dismay. But as he says, he wants to feel like he’s doing something, even if it’s just cleaning up a part of a beach – which is absolutely littered with scrap and garbage. As they perform this less than glamorous task, Aang is approached by two kids who are in awe of him. Even more so after they reveal they’re firebenders and Aang in turn tells them he knows Firelord Zuko. Sokka wonders if they’d be as impressed with Aang if they were non-benders. Although he passes it off as a joke, as is his wont.

Later that night, Toph wakes up to a suspicious noise. As it turns out, someone had jammed the ore-processing machine, which causes it to explode. Toph and Aang takes off in pursuit of the saboteurs as Katara remains behind to put the fire out. The saboteurs turn out to be… the firebenders we’d seen the two young women recruit. Toph fights a young woman while Aang chases the old leader of the gang. He corners him on a cliff overlooking the water and quickly overcomes his valiant but futile resistance… before the cliff crumbles, sending him plummeting to his doom.

Which wasn’t a coincidence, as we see the two women who had hired the firebenders observing the spectacle. The earthbender caused the cliff to crumble to silence him… but unfortunately for them, Aang is there to swoop to his rescue. The two (whose names are Ru and Yaling) report back to Liling, who unsurprisingly turns out to be their mother. They argue and try to blame each other, but Liling cuts the argument short, insisting that while it’s unfortunate that their patsy had survived, it’s too late to do anything. She insists that they must stand together as family and that not even the Avatar can stop their plans. Thus setting her up as the most likely villain of Imbalance.

That’s enough for a recap. What are my impressions of the story and characters?

The bender/non-bender conflict

To start with, people actually talk about the conflict more than one sentence at a time and we see it rather than just being vaguely told about it. That’s already a major upgrade from the franchise’s previous attempts. But that’s a low bar to clear, so let’s dig into what we get.

Unsurprisingly, the root of the conflict seems to be in quickly-changing technology and social conditions. Cranefish Town grew quickly and is full of people who came seeking work but there’s just not enough of it for everyone. This bred poverty and inequality, with all that it implies. Benders are of course privileged in the pursuit of work… or were, until recently.

As I mentioned in the recap, we actually see benders end up on the wrong side of the changing world. Advanced machinery reduces the need for bending in ore processing, making highly-skilled benders less economical. After the first round of layoffs, the other benders felt machines were replacing them.

With no work, benders ended up criminals. This adds some appreciated nuance to the situation, for now at least. We’ll see how it progresses from here. Still, it’s hard to forget that the benders’ perspective is that of a privilege they lost. One that non-benders never had.

After all, if non-benders got to keep their jobs in the ore-processing plants, it’s because they demanded lower wages. And there’s more of them, so the positions operating the machines can’t provide work for all of them. Satoru’s goals here are, after all, to reduce overhead and keep the factory running more smoothly and economically. This makes both benders and non-benders victims of capitalism and the demand for profit.

Even those non-benders who do have jobs are afraid to leave their homes to work at them, due to bending gangs in the streets. Which is the more down-to-earth sort of inequality, less tied up with economic forces. Benders are simply more dangerous if they turn to violence. We see it rather clearly during the first fight that the Gaang witness.

The non-benders’ refusal to let Aang and Toph repair the damage was a curious story element to me, one that I liked. It might seem irrational, but I think it makes sense considering the circumstances. Their home was destroyed by benders – if they let benders repair it, their livelihood depends even more on the whims of benders. They’d rather keep their pride and regain their home with their own hands. One of them even sneeringly asks Aang if he’s going to force them to accept his help. It suggests that they view benders largely as people who go around and bully others with their power. And Aang is just the biggest bender of all.

Unlike in the first season of Legend of Korra, the council running the city is split between benders and non-benders. Which is both better and worse than when it had one member for each nation, but no non-benders for some reason. Lao’s proposal of banning bending on the streets is controversial, but one can see where he comes from. Still, benders are not going to be happy about a suggestion to forbid them from using their natural abilities. It does treat them as dangerous until proven otherwise, in a way.

It’s hard to deny that whenever action starts, non-benders aren’t part of it. The guards of the metalworks are non-benders, but they don’t do anything except raise their shields between Lao and incoming rocks. Ru might or might not be a bender – either way, she just stands around while her sister mops the floor with a whole room full of firebenders.

No one except Lao seems to take the idea of non-bending police officers terribly seriously. And we do know that the only non-bending officer we saw in the first season of Korra was issuing tickets for vagrancy. Then there were the two detectives whose obstruction of Mako’s investigation made some think they were corrupt, but they were actually just that stupid. But that was in Book Two, which entirely forgot any bender/non-bender tensions.

I bring it up because this comic does seem to take on some topics that Book One of The Legend of Korra ignored entirely despite how obvious they were to the bender/non-bender conflict. The problem of bender-dominated law enforcement is one such thing. But can it really deal with those problems, if it has to eventually result in the status quo we saw in 2012? One that led to the Equalist revolution?

That’s for the central conflict of the story. Now let’s take a look at how individual characters acquit themselves in the first part of Imbalance.

The dramatis personae

Aang

The Avatar is his usual self here. He wants to help everyone and feels like the whole world is on his shoulders. But he also finds the pace of progress off-putting and feels like the world is leaving him behind. Once again he has to accept that progress is inevitable and simply try to guide it down the right path.

Katara

Katara’s portrayal in the Avatar franchise after the ATLA finale hasn’t exactly been stellar. I can’t help but feel like this comic doesn’t help. She spends her time hanging off Aang’s arm, providing him with moral support and performing off-screen tasks like saving civilians and putting out fires. Obviously, space on a page is in limited supply and the authors have to dole it out. But it’s hard not to see it as part of Katara’s consistent sidelining.

Toph

Toph promises to potentially play a more crucial role in the story, which we’ve only seen hints of so far. She’s now an executive partner in Earthen Fire Industries and seems to take her job quite seriously. Which means that it ruffles her feathers when her father is much more concerned with getting Aang’s help with the city’s problems. She also cavalierly dismisses the challenges of benders who had lost their jobs, because she feels like her metalbending is irreplaceable. It won’t surprise me if all of those come to a head. And, after all, we know that when Republic city eventually got a metalbending police force, she was its leader.

Sokka

Sokka’s part in the story has been relatively minor so far, and I hope it changes. As the Gaang’s token non-bender he is, after all, right square in the middle of the conflict. So far he proved content to sit out a fight between benders but offered his insight into the problem later. He also wonders if the two kids at the beach would idolize Aang so much if they were non-benders.

Lao Beifong

Toph’s father plays a pretty major part in the first book and is an ambiguous figure. His treatment of Toph is rather cold and callous, but maybe we can excuse it somewhat due to the town’s problems. He does seem genuine in trying to fix them, but also rather eager to hide behind Aang in doing so. His proposal to ban bending in the streets is drastic, but meant to combat a real issue… and yet he also tries to push it off onto Aang.

Satoru

I don’t know much about Satoru, having not read The Rift. In this comic, his actions in running his factory drive much of the conflict. His pursuit of efficiency and innovation ended up putting benders out of work and creating a rift between them and non-benders. He seems regretful of it, as his only goal was to make his factory work better.

Liling

And here is the villain of Imbalance as established by having the last panel of the book focus on her face as she gloats nefariously. While we never saw her bend, she sat on the benders’ side of the council. She offered the services of her security team to serve as law and order in Cranefish Town. Later on, we see her two daughters, one of whom is an earthbender, bully firebending criminals into sabotaging Earthen Fire Industries.

Her motives for it all are a mystery as of yet. The only hint we get is when she speaks to her daughters, claiming that she had asked them to do what they did for their family and the future of their home. Maybe she intends to sabotage the technology and progress that threaten the benders’ place in the world.

However, one of her daughters, Ru, is rather conspicuously not bending. She does the talking while Yaling beats people up and collapses cliffs. Is she a non-bender, then? If so, how does that fit into her mother’s plans? Maybe they’re not quite as bender-centric and simply use the tensions in the city for their own ends like Noatak used the Equalists as patsies for his personal revenge. That would be somewhat disappointing, but I won’t rule it out.

Still, it brings to attention something that I wonder if it’ll become relevant. The comic makes the bender/non-bender starker than any other part of the Avatar franchise, with both groups engaging in “us versus them” thinking. And yet, it’s not as simple, because families can have both benders and non-benders in them. Liling’s family might be one such example, but there’s also Toph’s family. How do they deal with this?

For now, Liling’s status as the instigator of the sabotage is out of our protagonists’ sights. Aang and Sokka only saw her as the calm, reasonable, and helpful councilwoman who offered a better solution than Lao had. She’s definitely shaping up as a manipulative and subtle villain, rather than an obvious threat. Of course, this can change.

Well, here we go. For now, I have reasons to be cautiously optimistic, as the new writer seems to know where she’s going with the story and its central conflict. The specter of having to eventually end in a way that results in LoK’s Book One looms over it, but maybe it won’t stop the story from being entertaining and more in-depth.


Images courtesy of Dark Horse Comics

Continue Reading

Comics

The Wicked + The Divine: The First God’s Final Gig

Published

on

By

It’s safe to say we’re just about to reach the finish line to the harrowing, yet hauntingly charming world of WicDiv. We’ve seen the colourful cast grow as individuals, let us down, rise up anew to our graces, and of course, die. Character deaths have become such a high selling point in contemporary media, WicDiv has certainly lived up to the standard, and maybe even given a few TV shows a run for their money. When talking about character deaths, we’d do well to remember it all relies on shock factor. Either punish the reader/viewer by turning their investment on a character against them, or swipe them away out of nowhere, or both.

Sometimes, though, it’s a gradual process – really just about how low a character can get. Then character death becomes character assassination, and it can work like a charm if handled well. This is one of the central themes today. Just how low can Ananke/Minerva go to continue their life cycle?

Issue #40
“We’ve got to look after each other.”

Incidentally, who may this fella on the cover be? Judging by the face paint, he’s probably a Persephone fan, which prompts a few questions, given the development around her on the past few issues. It may be slightly ironic that the cover portrays an aspect of worship to a Goddess that isn’t technically one. But is it indeed ironic? Or is it fitting as she works towards the long-due downfall of the Maiden and the Crone, thus renaming these last few days the Twilight of the Gods? That Persephone’s vendetta and the possible end of the Recurrence* overlap is actually incidental, and that’s the keyword here: incidental.

For it is through a catastrophic incident that we enter this narrative. We begin with the foreboding, journalistic in-extrema res approach, which tells about as much as it withholds. “Footage recorded surrounding the events of the O2 disaster of 1st May 2015.”

Meet Tom, the fellow on the cover; Pantheon-themed Youtuber in the middle of an unboxing video, for we can never have enough of those. Whether there is sarcasm to be found in my authorial tone or not, that is up to you. Nonetheless, this Pantheon Unboxing deserves some special attention given the goodie inside the box: Tickets for the O2 event, aka Baal’s final gig. Lovely readers, are the alarms in your head ringing? If they’re not, they should. Performativity and character go hand-in-hand, which says a lot considering Baal turned out to be a fiery child murderer – not that his fans know it.

We are then treated to a blueprint of the gig’s stage at the O2 stadium, as well as some hidden footage. The highly technical detail is not merely an stylistic choice; we get to know everything about Baal’s final gig. By repurposing Dionysus’ mimicry psi-ound system, Minerva and Baal mean to harness the attending audience’s energies to lure the Great Darkness. Baal is not hesitant in the slightest, but he does tearfully dread the event to come. He’s dreaded killing children to fight the Great Darkness as it is, so what could be worse than that? How about using the death scream of all in attendance to put the enemy down for good?

That’s 20,000 civilian casualties. And that’s is not even the end of it; his mum is gonna be among those. Hey, but if this doesn’t feel sufficiently Macbeth-meets-Lear-times-million yet, how about this? Minerva villainously reveals her plan to an unknown witness (probably Mimir) as she gloats. The Great Darkness she spoke about, it’s implied to be a lie – an acceptable, generic, ominous scapegoat to unite the Gods under her intent. The massive bodycount at the O2 will release ‘psychic fuel’ to generate a new world-wide mind plague. All the while she remains safely in a shelter of her choice.

Hoo boy…

Well, what say you we switch to a brighter, though doomed, scene? Tom and his buddy Nathan record themselves at the huge line entrance to the event. There they run into Julie, a girl whom Tom asked out. Things didn’t go as he intended; he is bisexual, but she’s only into girls, so there’s an evident incompatibility there. Furthermore, he knew about this, but still tried with the hope of getting to be an exception. Things are now suitably awkward between them. But if there’s any good to draw from here is that Tom is sulking, but he’s not resentful. Weird how common decency has become so rare that it feels like a character trait sometimes, eh?

As the day turns to evening, Tom and Nathan still wait in line. The former has significantly lowered the sulking, but remains in reflection mode. He begins to talk about Persephone, revealing he was present during her debut, when she asserted her name as the Destroyer. Tom (accurately) detects sadness behind her dark masquerade, vaguely feeling that she was trying to punish herself. In this way, he feels a sense of kinship with Persephone, identifying himself as the Destroyer of the bond between Julie and he.

They will never an item, but they can still be friends if he works to mend that bond. And that’s the very thing he does inside of the venue proper as he helps her out of a bad situation with a dude. Julie is initially relieved but then looks understandably cautious about the gesture. Tom puts down all hint of an ulterior motive by saying that they have to look out for one another – because that’s what friends do. In this day and age, there’s unfortunately no way to not take something like that with a grain of salt, but something he says to Nathan shines some credibility into what he did.

And I’ll quote, boldly (in italics): “But… the thing about realising you’re the destroyer? It’s a step towards not being one.”

What a wholesome turn of events. Unfortunately, the gig starts now. From the musical performances I’ve seen in comics, they’re mostly hit-or-miss. There’s no effective conveying of the energy you get a live show. But then again, Jamie McKelvie is Jamie McKelvie, and he was a way to put ‘buts’ in everything I saw or do. He pulls it off, even in just a few panels. One can only imagine the exact genre Baal performs (To me, it’s Benjamin Clementine meets Pure Reason Revolution meets Skepta), but the constant for all readers will be the sensation of intensity. Baal radiates with it, and the audience feels it. And it looks and feels real.

But then, the God-performance kicks in, and the audience’s energy becomes a drooling trance. It’s kind of hilarious, to tell it true. The panels are intertwined with testimonies of the people in attendance, all gravitating around feelings of adoration, ecstasy and whatnot, then followed by those same people all zombie-like… with the peculiar exception of Tom. Maybe self-awareness really is an effective shield against BS. That’s an allegory I’ll gladly take ownership of, thank you very much.

The energy starts building up and we’re taken to a wide shot of the stadium’s exterior. The light under the dome intensifies to such degree that we can imagine everybody in attendance about to die. Strangely, at the brightest moment, we see a gigantic shadow-like being desintegrating from the light, begging the question. Could the Great Darkness, as an actual being, actually exist? What remains after the light mini-Apocalypse dies down is a huge cloud of smoke, and a promise of disaster…

… Or just collective alarm. The people inside of the O2 are still alive, if in a state of panic and confusion. As Tom helps Nathan and Julie find their way around, Persephone’s kindred spirit receives a video call from the Destroyer herself: “Everyone stay calm, I’m here to save you. I’ll put you all under and guide you out. Trust me.”

It’s going to be okay.

Our girl has hijacked the show. Not as Persephone, but as Laura Wilson.

Pardon me while I freak out. Stay tuned, lovelies.

 

 

The Wicked + The Divine Issue #40 Credits

Writer: Kieron Gillen

Art / Cover: Jamie McKelvie, Matt Wilson

All images are courtesy of Image Comics

 

Continue Reading

Analysis

Image Comics “DIE” is an Instant Dark Fantasy Masterpiece

Published

on

By

There are so many factors that have come into play when I first heard about Image comics newest release, DIE, that it is hard to pinpoint the real reason it intrigued me so heavily. Who am I kidding, it was all the reasons. Most importantly the staff on it.

For one, it features two of my favorite Image Comics alum. The first being Kieron Gillen, the mastermind that gave us the brilliant comic The Wicked And The Divine,which is one of the best ongoing comics at the moment. On the art work is the incredibly talented Stephanie Hans whose realistic and beautifully shaded and colored panels were also featured in The Wicked And The Divine‘s 1831 one shot as well across other comic distributors such as DC with Deadman: Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love. The two coming together again like in 1831 is a match that builds this comic up to be really something special.

Image, in the last few years has really been producing some special and important books in the past few years, among them being The Wicked and the Divine, some of the more acclaimed include Saga, Blackbird, Paper Girls,and Infidel, the company takes a proud departure from Superheroes that dominate the comic industry and opt for more fantasy or science fiction stories with adult and political themes.

Lastly, the plot was incredibly unique and original. When it was advertised as Jumanji meets It, I was instantly interested. While not being a player of table top games myself, I can certainly see the crowd this book is trying to reach while also showing the fun about these games with an added horror twist that is sure to be remembered after the first issue.

The story really does follow a similar timeline to the mentioned Stephen King novel since it follows a group of friends during two periods of their lives: as teenagers and as adults. As we are introduced to each member of the group, we notice nothing in particularly strange about their characters, other than a shared love for table top games and science fiction and fantasy themes. The group has gathered together to celebrate the birthday of their friend Dominic by playing an apparently hard to find game called Gormenghast.

We learn a little about each character based on their choice of created characters. Dominic himself creates a diplomat woman that’s apparently a cross between Cleopatra and Machiavelli, the Dictator. Matthew, a magical warrior of empathy, the Grief Knight. Angela, a cyber punk, Neo. Isabelle, an atheist with gods as pets, Godbinder. Chuck, a lazily created every-man. And Sol the dungeon master with D20 die.

As the game begins the comic cuts to two hours later as Sol’s mum comes to check on them and they have disappeared. Fast forward again and it’s two years later and the group suddenly appears on a random road nearly getting hit by a car. Angela is missing her arm and we can’t really make out what happened, they are now only known as the Stafford six a group of teenagers who went missing two years ago. Sol is the only one missing from the group.

The comic again goes in time to 25 years later where we get to see how this tragedy has affected the rest of their lives. Apparently they had all made a promise never to speak about what happened, not even to one another. Sol’s mother even after so many years pesters Dominic about the fate of her son, to which he avoids. Using brilliant dialogue we see just how dark this has made their lives. Dom seems not to keep in touch with all the others except his sister who has gone through a string of divorces. They have made the best of living with their memories but it is all destroyed when Dom receives a package at a bar, a bloodied D20 die.

It’s at this moment that he decides to reunite the group. After so much time, some have changed completely while others not at all…I’m looking at you Chuck. While some have new companions and some less. They decide as a group to finally discuss what happened that night and where they were for two years until the die calls out to them. The Grandmaster threatens the realm and a hero is needed it calls as they are all sucked into the die and land into a desert ruin. It’s apparent that they have all become their characters…why does Chuck look like Varric.

With the end of the issue the group bickers among themselves about being back in the game, something they’ve repressed for nearly half their lives until Sol appears as the new Grandmaster. What I took from his dialogue is that he was trapped by the previous one and during these long years he’s fought a war to survive or escape and eventually defeated him and became the Grandmaster himself. It’s not clear whether he’s sane or not at this point but it points to the latter as he tells his friends that they are not leaving until the game is over.

This first issue was great at establishing its main cast. While I kept most of those details out of this review, the book really fleshes them out individually and gives life to each of their personalities. Anyone who has read The Wicked and the Divine will know just how well Gillen handles diversity among characters as well as conflicting attitudes. They actually feel like a group of friends you might have been a part of in high school. I really loved this book and I can’t wait to see what adventures await us.


Images Courtesy of Image Comics

Continue Reading

Trending